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Wednesday, April 2

Wednesday, February 12

  1. page canada edited ... 2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy) …
    ...
    2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy)
    2008 - A Snapshot State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada
    ...
    from 2012-2013 waswere published by
    This study has four overall components (and these sections of the wiki will be updated using information from the reports as time permits, so it is best to simply consult the reports listed above):
    provide an overview of the nature of the education system in Canada to provide the necessary background information for a potential international audience,
    (view changes)
    6:48 pm
  2. page canada edited ... Virtual Schooling in Canada The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study t…
    ...
    Virtual Schooling in Canada
    The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study to examine the state of K-12 e-learning in Canada. The following reports have been published as a part of this study:
    2013 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Open School BC, eDynamic Learning, LEARN, Pearson Canada, Virtual High School (Ontario), British Columbia Teachers Federation, Heritage Christian Schools)
    2012 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Open School BC, Heritage Christian Schools, LEARN, LearningMate Solutions Inc., & Florida Virtual School)
    2011 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy, Digitel Inc., & Heritage Christian Schools)
    ...
    2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy)
    2008 - A Snapshot State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada
    ...
    and the 2012 reportreports from 2012-2013 was published
    This study has four overall components (and these sections of the wiki will be updated using information from the reports as time permits, so it is best to simply consult the reports listed above):
    provide an overview of the nature of the education system in Canada to provide the necessary background information for a potential international audience,
    (view changes)
    6:48 pm

Thursday, May 30

Friday, October 19

  1. page canada edited ... The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study to examine the state of K-12 e…
    ...
    The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study to examine the state of K-12 e-learning in Canada. The following reports have been published as a part of this study:
    2012 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Open School BC, Heritage Christian Schools, LEARN, LearningMate Solutions Inc., & Florida Virtual School)
    ...
    Academy, Digitel Inc.Inc., & Heritage
    ...
    Connections Academy, Desire2LearnDesire2Learn, & K12,
    2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy)
    2008 - A Snapshot State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada
    (view changes)
    10:03 am
  2. page canada edited ... Virtual Schooling in Canada The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study t…
    ...
    Virtual Schooling in Canada
    The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study to examine the state of K-12 e-learning in Canada. The following reports have been published as a part of this study:
    2012 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Open School BC, Heritage Christian Schools, LEARN, LearningMate Solutions Inc., & Florida Virtual School)
    2011 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy, Digitel Inc. & Heritage Christian Schools)
    2010 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy, Desire2Learn & K12, Inc.)
    2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy)
    2008 - A Snapshot State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada
    TheseThe reports arefrom 2008-2011 were published by
    ...
    K-12 Online Learning.Learning and the 2012 report was published by Open School BC.
    This study has four overall components (and these sections of the wiki will be updated using information from the reports as time permits, so it is best to simply consult the reports listed above):
    provide an overview of the nature of the education system in Canada to provide the necessary background information for a potential international audience,
    examine the provincial Government legislation and policies that govern the use of distance education in each province and territory,
    include a thorough survey of all of the virtual schools that are currently in operation on a province-by-province basis all across Canada, and
    ...
    an annotated bibliography.bibliography (last updated with the 2010 report).
    Those members of the research group working on this project include:
    Nandita Mani (2008)
    ...
    Robin Stewart (2007-09)
    Joe Vrazo (2011)
    Naimah Wade (2012)
    Lin Zhang (2007-08)
    Last updated: 01 December 201119 October 2012
    (view changes)
    8:43 am

Thursday, December 1

  1. page canada edited ... Virtual Schooling in Canada The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study t…
    ...
    Virtual Schooling in Canada
    The purpose of this project is to conduct a comprehensive study to examine the state of K-12 e-learning in Canada. The following reports have been published as a part of this study:
    20092011 - State
    ...
    Learning in Canada> Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy, Digitel Inc. & Heritage Christian Schools)
    2010 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy, Desire2Learn & K12, Inc.)
    2009 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada (sponsored by Connections Academy)

    2008 - A Snapshot State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada
    ThisThese reports are published by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning.
    This
    study has
    ...
    as time permits):permits, so it is best to simply consult the reports listed above):
    provide an overview of the nature of the education system in Canada to provide the necessary background information for a potential international audience,
    examine the provincial Government legislation and policies that govern the use of distance education in each province and territory,
    ...
    Nandita Mani (2008)
    Josh Rouan (2009)
    Jason Siko (2010-11)
    Robin Stewart (2007-09)
    Joe Vrazo (2011)
    Lin Zhang (2007-08)
    Last updated: 28 February 201001 December 2011
    (view changes)
    9:13 am

Saturday, February 27

  1. page overview edited Project Home / Home Overview of the Canadian Education System Canada ranks highly among the nat…
    Project Home / Home
    Overview of the Canadian Education System

    Canada ranks highly among the nations of the world in educational spending per capita. However, Canada does not have a national policy for or governing body with jurisdiction over education. Canada is a confederation of ten provinces and three territories, and responsibility for education falls within the provincial and territorial level. As such, each province and territory has a Ministry of Education that assumes the responsibility for the elementary, secondary and post-secondary education. Each ministry develops the policies, standards, and curriculum to support student learning within their province or territory.
    Similarities in the educational structure exist between the thirteen regions: The school year, for most provinces, generally operates from September through June. Most provinces have a system that runs from kindergarten to grade twelve (although, up until 2002-03, the Province of Ontario also had a grade thirteen or Ontario Academic Credit (OAC)). In addition, while the province of Quebec only has formal schooling from kindergarten to grade eleven, upon the completion of grade eleven those students who are continuing with their education attend Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel or CEGEP. CEGEP, which translates to “College of General and Vocational Education,” is two years of general or three years of technical education between high school and college or university.
    (view changes)
    10:17 pm
  2. page overview edited ... Similarities in the educational structure exist between the thirteen regions: The school year,…
    ...
    Similarities in the educational structure exist between the thirteen regions: The school year, for most provinces, generally operates from September through June. Most provinces have a system that runs from kindergarten to grade twelve (although, up until 2002-03, the Province of Ontario also had a grade thirteen or Ontario Academic Credit (OAC)). In addition, while the province of Quebec only has formal schooling from kindergarten to grade eleven, upon the completion of grade eleven those students who are continuing with their education attend Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel or CEGEP. CEGEP, which translates to “College of General and Vocational Education,” is two years of general or three years of technical education between high school and college or university.
    [add table]
    Then[1] Then students attend
    Students in most regions attend kindergarten on a voluntary basis, with formal education beginning at grade one when the students are 5-6 years of age. Most provincial laws mandate that students attend school until the age of 15 or 16.
    Most provinces support a public education system where funding is provided through provincial taxes; and every school in the province or territory receives the same basic per-student funding based upon enrollment– usually through their individual school districts – with additional funding made available for special programmes. The student funding is primarily used to pay for consumables within the school, and most provinces and territories have separate funding for the maintenance of the school buildings. All provinces and territories directly pay faculty and support staff salaries based upon collective agreements signed between the government and the professional associations or unions. Several provinces also support a separate public education systems for religious or language preferences (and this is based historically upon the nature of systems publicly supported at the time of Confederation). While the structural similarities exist, the individual Ministries develop their curriculum to respect the unique geography, history and culture of their regions.
    In 1967, a Council of Ministers of Education was formed. This council provided a forum for the provincial and territorial ministries to discuss matters of common interest. The council represents the voice of the provinces when in discussion with the federal government. While the responsibility of education is a provincial/ territorial matter, federal government policies influence many aspect of the education system such as official languages, post-secondary education funding, human resource development, and, more recently, information and communications technology.
    ...
    SchoolNet (see http://web.archive.org/web/20070620112548/http:www.schoolnet.ca/http://web.archive.org/web/20070620112548/http://www.schoolnet.ca/ – note
    ...
    Program (see http://cap.ic.gc.ca/index.htm)http://cap.ic.gc.ca/index.htm ) programmes. Typically
    For more information on the structure of education system in Canada and the role the federal government plays through these national programmes, see Barbour (2005).
    Bibliography
    ...
    of educational technologies//.technologies. Athens, GA:
    (view changes)
    10:16 pm
  3. page overview edited Canada ranks highly among the nations of the world in educational spending per capita. However, …

    Canada ranks highly among the nations of the world in educational spending per capita. However, Canada does not have a national policy for or governing body with jurisdiction over education. Canada is a confederation of ten provinces and three territories, and responsibility for education falls within the provincial and territorial level. As such, each province and territory has a Ministry of Education that assumes the responsibility for the elementary, secondary and post-secondary education. Each ministry develops the policies, standards, and curriculum to support student learning within their province or territory.
    Similarities in the educational structure exist between the thirteen regions: The school year, for most provinces, generally operates from September through June. Most provinces have a system that runs from kindergarten to grade twelve (although, up until 2002-03, the Province of Ontario also had a grade thirteen or Ontario Academic Credit (OAC)). In addition, while the province of Quebec only has formal schooling from kindergarten to grade eleven, upon the completion of grade eleven those students who are continuing with their education attend Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel or CEGEP. CEGEP, which translates to “College of General and Vocational Education,” is two years of general or three years of technical education between high school and college or university.
    [add table]
    Then students attend two to three years of CEGEP.
    Students in most regions attend kindergarten on a voluntary basis, with formal education beginning at grade one when the students are 5-6 years of age. Most provincial laws mandate that students attend school until the age of 15 or 16.
    Most provinces support a public education system where funding is provided through provincial taxes; and every school in the province or territory receives the same basic per-student funding based upon enrollment– usually through their individual school districts – with additional funding made available for special programmes. The student funding is primarily used to pay for consumables within the school, and most provinces and territories have separate funding for the maintenance of the school buildings. All provinces and territories directly pay faculty and support staff salaries based upon collective agreements signed between the government and the professional associations or unions. Several provinces also support a separate public education systems for religious or language preferences (and this is based historically upon the nature of systems publicly supported at the time of Confederation). While the structural similarities exist, the individual Ministries develop their curriculum to respect the unique geography, history and culture of their regions.
    In 1967, a Council of Ministers of Education was formed. This council provided a forum for the provincial and territorial ministries to discuss matters of common interest. The council represents the voice of the provinces when in discussion with the federal government. While the responsibility of education is a provincial/ territorial matter, federal government policies influence many aspect of the education system such as official languages, post-secondary education funding, human resource development, and, more recently, information and communications technology.
    While Canada has no national or federal department of education, the federal government has been able to maintain a role in provincial and territorial education systems. One way this presence in education is felt is through the funding of federal programmes that schools can take advantage of, such as the Department of Industry’s SchoolNet (see http://web.archive.org/web/20070620112548/http:www.schoolnet.ca/ – note that SchoolNet ceased to exist on 20 June 2007 and this link is via the Internet archive) or Community Access Program (see http://cap.ic.gc.ca/index.htm) programmes. Typically these programmes have focused upon items of national interest or importance, for example, providing Internet access to schools or the general public (particularly in rural and remote areas), increasing students’ use of technology in schools, laying the infrastructure for a national high speed network, etc.. These programmes have also usually been undertaken in partnership with the various provincial and territorial Ministries of Education.
    For more information on the structure of education system in Canada and the role the federal government plays through these national programmes, see Barbour (2005).
    Bibliography
    Barbour, M. K. (2005). Educational Technologies in Canada. In M. Orey, T. Amiel, J. McClendon, & M. K. Barbour (Eds.), The world almanac of educational technologies//. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://www.waet.uga.edu/wiki/index.php/Canada

    (view changes)
    10:14 pm

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